Saturday, October 14, 2017

Phase 6,963

Organic apple cider vinegar brewing. This is the first batch made at the Plum Palace, and the first new batch made in over a year. I used a wee bit of the dregs from the last batch to help start this one. This stuff is like liquid gold. I used previous batches for my business as luscious infused skincare, and the soupier stuff I used at home for cleaning, as food, and as medicine. If you've got gut issues from using antibiotics or from a bout of gastroenteritis, take a shot glass of organic unpasteurized apple cider vinegar with your probiotic of choice to get your gut right again. Using it as a facial wash or toner makes your skin glowy, but you can't use it every day or you'll dry out like a prune, and it works wonders for my granddaughter's eczema flare-ups. She once had a stubborn patch of eczema that didn't respond to any of the otc or prescribed creams we used, but a couple of apple cider vinegar baths later and that stuff was shut down for over two years. Now, all of this is anecdotal as I'm not a scientist, but there is some evidence that apple cider vinegar helps with all of the issues I've brought up here. Once this batch is done, it will be divided into three jars and infused with botanical extracts for the shop, then I'm starting another batch for the house.

The rest of the skincare is coming along. I'm awaiting the arrival of a couple more essential oils for argan infused butter bars and balms, get those finished, then it's on to the soaps. I'm also going to whip up a batch of Yasmina oil perfume. I've had more than a few requests for this lush perfume in the past year, so I'm bringing it back and keeping it. And maybe a rose oil perfume too.


 

I've missed this.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Cat's Outta The Bag


Today, my assistant and I are going to start phase two of three of the Djinn's naked natural skincare, butters 'n balms. There's also a batch of phase one product, a lovely frankincense extract infused facial mask, left to complete. And then in the coming days we will begin phase three, extract infused natural handmade soap. Eventually perfumes, alcohol, solid, and oil, will be added, as well as incense. I've got Kyphi brewing at the moment. Plus I have some compounded incense resins that were being worked on this time last year that are just about ready to go.

It's coming together -- now if I could just get the shop off of Etsy and onto the new website, it'll be legit.

Monday, October 09, 2017

Tuberose

Tuberose bud, Justine's garden, October 2017

I got another single flowering tuberose this year. Last year I got one that bloomed in a different pot than this one. They all grow, all the wee bulbs, but I'm not getting any flowering except for one at a time, two years in a row. So. They get their own bed now. Out of the pots, where my hope is they've multiplied, and into a permanent bed where they can be harvested in a year -- that is, if they all decide to bloom instead of taking turns like the polite little flowers they are. I clipped the single bloom last night and put it in water and set it on the kitchen counter. It has filled the kitchen and dining area with scent. Everyone keeps calling it 'honeysuckle', which kind of bugs, but what do they know? Perhaps tuberose is progressive and would link arms with honeysuckle in defense of all flowers. I'd rather think their hermit-like behavior is rooted in a strong sense of self and confidence rather than in flower class snobbery.

I just overheard someone here call them 'two bros'.

Saturday, October 07, 2017

New Beginnings

I have a Roundup neighbor.

The house to the right of ours had been unsold and vacant since we moved in in August until about two weeks ago. The house is enormous with two master suites and 3 additional bedrooms, a large open concept living/kitchen area, and a formal dining room. The backyard is dinky, though, apartment sized. Yet the two people who moved in take turns with the Roundup sprayer shooting every square inch of their property, both the landscaped front and unlandscaped back, almost daily. I've never seen a weed phobia like this before. I can't use any of the rosemary planted on the right side of my driveway because of the Mr.'s Roundup, and I'm beginning to wonder how saturated the fence boards on that side of the backyard have become. I'm planting all of my vegetables and perfumery plants in raised beds with liners to avoid weeds, and I guess to some extent, Roundup now too. I may have to have a talk with them if they keep up with this poisoning business.

I hope and pray the neighbors on the left don't get chemical crazy. So far they seem to appreciate plants as they have a jungle of potted plants in their backyard. There is life in suburbia after all.

I'm setting up shop again in the new place. Today we begin mixing and formulating some really fantastic all natural mineral and botanical skincare. A package of organic cocoa butter arrived here yesterday and my new assistant proclaimed, as I walked in the door from being gone all day, "I don't know what's in that bag, but it smells just like chocolate!" It does indeed!

One problem I'm finding living in this new place is postal delivery. The neighborhood is so new, and so far out of the city limits that it doesn't have a regular post office delivery service but a contract delivery service. If what is being shipped to my house isn't a big box that won't fit in the box at the end of the block -- the big boxes get delivered to the door -- the contract worker will send them back to the post office marked return to sender if the mailbox parcel cubicle already has someone else's parcel in it. I've had three packages sent back because of this, so now I will be looking into getting a PO box, which, honestly, I should do anyway. I'm sure the contract worker is run ragged and probably isn't obligated to keep trying to re-deliver mail, but it's damned inconvenient not getting my stuff on time. Hence the delay in getting The Scented Djinn up and running again. Well, that and everything else that's been going on around here.

I count myself very fortunate despite these minor set-backs, because they are just that -- minor.





Saturday, September 23, 2017

Getting In The Groove Again

Both classes, the natural perfume intensive and the Kyphi incense class, are full with energy and synchronicity. It feels like a bit of a let-down when I have to shut down the computer and put the courses to bed for the evening. I'm enjoying myself immensely with this new group of people.

I'm also making Kyphi again. I've yet to get to those boxes in the garage as late Wednesday I began to feel the ticking scratch of a cold coming on. I've been on 12,000 mgs of C a day, zinc supplements, plus otc meds. The sinuses are congested, but I don't feel terrible like I did when I woke up Thursday morning with a pounding headache and a sore throat. It's never a good time for a cold, is it? Such a damned inconvenience no matter when they strike.

Once I get off the computer, in about a half an hour, I'm going to get to cleaning the house. When I'm not well and my energy is petering out, everyone here scatters like rats off a sinking ship. Once I feel better, today, actually, I'm left to clean up. I know. They're all adults. But that's what makes talking to them about cleaning up after their dirty bums so difficult. I get lots of, "I know." And, "I'll do it later." So maybe not quite adults yet.

Once I'm done cleaning the house, I'm going to start the goods for an early supper, and then get to tackling boxes in the garage. It seems like nobody is concerned with what's left out there since the cupboard's are full, the laundry is washed, the dishes are done, and there's food on the table. They're like cavemen -- ha!

I'd better get going then. There's Kyphi to make, and the skincare line -- oh, yeah, I'm starting a new skincare line. It debuts mid-October. Watch for it.


Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Fall and All She Brings

Now that the mad rush to finish the course is over, and the time it takes to do daily instruction has considerably whittled down the time I spend on the computer, I can get back to the house! I've got tons of boxes to unpack, warranties to fill out and mail, repair issues to deal with, and a string of birthdays coming up. And the central valley here in California seems to have let go of summer, finally. Just in time, too, for the official change into fall. You know you've gotten way to used to hot weather when 90 seems like a pleasant break. That means moving around is easier in terms of what gets done inside and outside.





We've begun the back yard, but there's a lot of work left to do. The soil is what we here in the valley call hardpan. Basically, it's like cement. The builders removed the top layer of soft soil when they leveled the lot, exposing all that lovely red hardpan. It's a mess to deal with, and will take a while to get it in shape for planting. We'll have to add some lime, gypsum, and lots of organic compost and churn it all into the ground. This will take a few weekends of all day digging. Again, the cooler weather helps immensely. Then I can start bulbs in raised beds and get some other plants in the ground. And get some grass growing so the grands will have somewhere to play next spring.

I received a shipment of oils yesterday, and, man, there were some nice ones in this lot. Cardamom CO2 is exquisite, beautifully green and fresh, with lovely floral back notes, and a slight twinge of eucalyptus. The CO2 is deeper and warmer than the cardamom essential oil from Guatamala (also in the box). The Guatamalan sample is brighter and more green with more of those eucalyptus notes and less of the warm floral note. Oakwood CO2 is a revelation. It is gourmand, warm, edible, with vanilla and cognac notes. I really love this stuff! The blue Egyptian chamomile (matricaria chamomilla) is stunning! Sweet, herbal, fruity, and surprisingly warm. Coffee CO2 is like a strong cuppa joe. Another winner. A gorgeous floral/fruity clove bud oil also arrived, reminding me of the turning of the seasons from hot to cool and the long nights spent in my garage studio creating tons of soap for the holidays. The bergamot oil, traditional, non FCF, smells brightly citrusy and sweet with hints of those famous floral notes. This one smells absolutely delicious! And last, but not least, juniper berry oil. This one is sweet and breathy and warm and fabulously beautiful. It reminds me of making Kyphi, the moment after crushing the first berries in the mortar and the sharp, sweet sting of scent that bursts forth.

Speaking of Kyphi, we're finally going to start our Kyphi batch for the course tomorrow on the eve of the new moon. I'm really looking forward to beginning this project.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

New Beginnings

The brand new International Perfume Foundation certified natural perfume course at The Natural Perfume Academy officially begins tomorrow -- well, if that isn't a mouthful. The interest in this course by the public has been astounding. Ruth and I busted our bums for months getting this new course up to par, and I think we're very nearly there. Our tutors have been working hard to update their courses, and we've begun translating the course into Spanish for a new course set to begin next year. This first six-month course will be the pilot course, and tweaks will occur both during and after the end of this run. It's exciting as hell, and a little bit scary as well. I can't help but to get a little nervous before each new course begins, but this one has me in knots. We've got videos -- with me in them (ugh) and I'm not the least bit sure of myself in this arena. We've got slideshows, which are far easier for me mentally -- ha! I've got a programmer working on a perfume formulation program for the course so the students can create their perfumes with ease -- aka, without all the maths involved. We even got an 'official' US and Canadian perfume kit supplier, Sunrose Aromatics, on board with us. We're still working on setting up the same kits with UK, EU, and Australian suppliers. Let me tell you, this isn't easy. Oftentimes, it's simply the politics that prevent forward motion. But we are persistent -- we've been doing this since 2008, so, yeah, we've learned a thing or two about how to get around, under, or barrel right through a problem.

This is where our 2017 Fall six-month course students live. It's pretty darned cool.


Tuesday, September 05, 2017

Garage Blues

Today I tackle the garage. Again. It's getting to the point where I don't want to anymore. Especially kitchen wares. The builders are coming out today to fix or replace the brand new dishwasher. I've been hand washing everything that comes out of those kitchen boxes because of the dishwasher being on the fritz and I'm well and done with it. I am in a rush to get the garage cleared out so I can set up my tables and shelves and get my studio wares sorted out, get some soap going and start on the new products for the shops. I'm under the gun here and it feels like I'm making very little progress. I know I said I work best under pressure, and I do, but there are only so many hours in a day, so many days until the looming deadline, and I'm moving as quickly as I can. It feels a bit like chasing my own bum.

Saturday, September 02, 2017

Jasmine Sambac

So, yesterday was a shopping day, gathering things for the new house to make it habitable, or at least pretty. Things like shower curtains, trash bins, cleaning supplies, etc. While digging around the end-of-summer offerings at a popular department store, I stumbled upon an entire shelf of Maid of Orleans Arabian jasmine, aka, jasmine sambac. And, they were practically giving them away! I got three, but I plan on returning and getting a few more. In my area, this type of jasmine has the potential to bloom year-round, with the best coming in the spring. Right now, these three wee plants are blooming like mad! Especially since getting them here, setting them up on the porch, and giving them a good drenching. 


They weren't blooming like this when I found them, in fact, most of the sambac at the store had very few flowers blooming. 

The scent is heavenly. I will be getting a jar of deodorized coconut oil later today and performing an enfleurage of these blossoms until they stop giving me flowers. It's going to be very hot, around 109 degrees F, a record breaker, and it's been unusually humid -- conditions, I've read, are best for growing this type of jasmine.




Friday, September 01, 2017

The World

Social media is killing me right now. For two weeks here at the new place all I had was my phone and it was plugged into FB constantly. With no internet to do extensive research, study, and writing on the computer itself, I got sucked into the vortex of bs. I'm just now beginning to extricate myself and work on real world projects. My heart just aches for the 'real world', too. I think I'm suffering from information overload, real and bogus.


Not only am I still working on the teacher's manual on the desk top computer for the new perfume course (with help now -- I have an assistant! -- and while sitting on a step-stool and a throw pillow because my office chair was ruined in the move) I'm also starting the first round of Kyphi making in the Walking the Kyphi Path online course I teach. Can I do it? Of course I can.

I found the brand new soap molds that I had been searching for during the entire 10 months we were living at my daughter's house, so I'm going to be making soap again soon -- for myself, and for the shops. I found these gorgeous lotus soap molds too, so those will be the fancy pants perfumed soaps I'll be selling on my official website, www.scenteddjinn.com

Gotta run. There's still so much to do setting up the house -- the garage is a jumble of boxes and furniture that have not yet made their way in. It's a work in progress, and especially taxing since most of the boxes contain kitchen contraptions that require washing before storing, and our nifty new dishwasher doesn't work. The builder's coming to fix that next week.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Incense & Perfume

Today the new washer and dryer arrived. They're on their second load now -- the second of many more to come. It's lovely having a washer and dryer inside of the house again, rather than in a cramped garage. It's just plain lovely having something that works the way it is intended to work.

The unpacking continues, and I suspect it will for many months to come. My main priority now is getting the course work done, sorting out the studio, and getting a Kyphi batch started up for the course on Kyphi making I teach at the Academy. It opened in May and so far we haven't created a single batch. I still have the second half of that gorgeous blue lotus Kyphi I made last year. It's ripe and delicious smelling and ready to be sold again.



It still amazes me how incense -- real, natural, resin-rich incense -- behaves over time. It's like a beautifully crafted natural perfume that ultimately ages into something exquisite and sublime. I've been going through a few of the boxes of old finished perfumes and discovered that the ones crafted with water -- the eaux -- are not as pretty as they once were. The water degrades them a bit, I think. Something about the pH level -- I'll have to test them to see if my theory is right. Which means only one thing (to me) -- natural perfumes don't need water. Over time, water does not benefit the perfume, and, in fact, might harm it -- a lot.


Tuesday, August 29, 2017

New Course Begins September 18


What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been

Did you miss me? It seems like forever since I was here. I just got internet yesterday and hooked up the computer last night before bed. It is now sitting in its own little cubby just off the dining area, kind of out of the way but still in the middle of the 'action' around here.

What an ordeal this move has been. So many situations popped up out of the blue (and some not so out of the blue) that tested every patient bone in my body. Basically, anything that could go wrong, did, starting with the moving van being the wrong size and ending with a possible job termination. One of my two precious kitties got very nervous about all the moving around in the old place that he decided to hide out for four days. My daughter brought him home to me late Thursday night after she caught him rooting around in her garage. He was skinny and starved and so happy to see us. Everything in between all of that was absolute hell too. I can't even accurately express how badly things went, and I really don't want to revisit. There were moments during those two weeks that I seriously considered packing a bag and hitting the road as a vagabond perfumer. I'm only now, two weeks in the house, feeling a stirring of excitement for it. I am no where near done unpacking. In fact, the garage where we've stored everything for the time being is as full as it can be and still be maneuverable, and the house inside is an absolute mess. There are still boxes stacked in the dining room waiting to be unpacked. There are pieces of art leaning against walls, curtain rod boxes and loose books lying around. We've got a list of things that need to be addressed by the builder, such as the non-working dishwasher and a crack in a cabinet door. Other than that, the house is perfect. Now if I could just get someone to come finish unpacking and clean this monstrosity for me . . .




At least all of my shop wares are in one place instead of scattered willy-nilly throughout the garage, and there won't be any trolls crawling on and through them to find their lost box of treasures they're sure are underneath. Everything is finally and truly in one place.

Tomorrow the washer and dryer will be delivered, and let me tell you, I need them right now. With all the cleaning going on, I've got a nice stack of dirty house rags in dire need of a wash. Plus I'm running out of clothes!

Once I get things a bit more settled inside, I'm going to begin working on the shop. I promised to have the online shops open by October, and that I will do. It's going to be a little bit different from what I have been doing -- going more into what I was up to this time last year, before the first move. Skincare will be featured, along with gorgeous scented stuff. And then there's the new online perfume course that I am still working on. The teacher's manual is only three units shy of completion, and while I've been out of the game for the past two weeks, I've been burning the midnight oil writing, with a pen, all the things I want to research and add to the manual. I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed, but as I've learned in the past, overwhelmed is my default setting, and it's the condition under which I operate best.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Aaaaaaand, We're In . . . Sort'a

Took long enough, right? And it hasn't been without it's major problems. More recently, it was the 'explosion' of the work car's transmission all the way over on the Central Coast -- this happened Sunday, the day before we were scheduled to close escrow. Late yesterday afternoon, before we got the call to pick up the keys, we got a call from the Chevy dealership in Arroyo Grande, where we left the work car, with the estimate for repairs -- $3,700 plus. The 'plus' was to cover the leaking manifold, which we didn't even want to hear about. We only paid $5000 for the car in 2007 and it's been very, very good to us, with over 270,000 hard miles on its leaky engine. We've had our eye on a little Toyota hoopty for $3000 and I think we're going to move on it now. G'bye old hoopty, hello new hoopty. Then, yesterday, when we were waiting for the call from the builder to come get the keys, we got crickets instead. Two o'clock came 'round, the time we were told it would be done, then three o'clock, then four -- then we had enough sitting on pins and needles. The hubs called to find out what was going on and the salesperson who sold us the house was as in the dark as we were, anyway, four phone calls later we discover the county's computer system was down and the house closing escrow hadn't posted, but everything was done. Damn. We got the keys anyway. Not allowing a little computer glitch to set us behind. Then as we were driving to get the keys, the new non-hoopty car decided to flash some danger dash lights -- looks like we'll be needing some new brakes soon -- but, Universe? Now? Geez. Haven't we had just about as much as we can handle for the moment? Spread this crap out a little, would you? But all will be well, once the dust settles. It always is.

We spent the night last night sealing grout and granite. Don't let anyone tell you it's easy. Well, technically it IS easy, it's just extremely time consuming. And the fumes can be a little much. Thank heaven there were five of us in rotation or it would have taken one person two days to get done.

I've been writing my bum off these past couple of weeks in hopes of getting done with the teacher's manual for the new course before the move, but it didn't happen. There are three major sections of the course that still need coverage and I'm pretty sure they won't be getting done this week. I did have the foresight to print the course out in its entirety so I could work offline on the teacher's manual, so there is that.

The moving van will be here shortly and I need to get moving. It's going to be another long day.

Monday, August 07, 2017

The New Ballgame

It's only one week before the move and I'm beginning to have feelings like I did in the days before giving birth -- calm and nesty. I had long ago stopped dreaming of how I would be setting everything up in the new place -- the sofa over here, the Tiffany lamp over there. All I've thought about for the last few months is that I just want out of where I am right now. With each set back, with each change in the move-in date, I'd lose a little bit of my shine. But now that it's nearly time, now that I'm on the verge of getting there, my patience for the process has come back. I'm planting the fragrant garden in my mind. I've got gardenia here, and jasmine grandiflorum there. A wee tuberose and hyacinth bed against the back fence, the damascenas and centifolias in the front where the sun shines brightest, yuzu and bitter orange trees in back on the west fence, and the iris pallida in clumps here and there.  Moving isn't going to be fun -- it never is -- but once the dust settles, everything will be rosy.

Plum Palace
I have a big 50% off sale going on at the Etsy store, which I'm closing on the 9th of August (two days from now). I won't reopen until some time in October, and I probably won't have the same items in stock that I do now. And the actual website will be opening up with new product. (www.scenteddjinn.com)

Changes all around this year. We (me and my business partner, Ruth) completely redesigned the Natural Perfume Academy. I've been working on the curriculum for the new certified course all summer long, and Ruth's been working on the overall design and function of the course. We even have a new logo. It's a whole new ballgame.



Wednesday, August 02, 2017

Time

I miss my Bama dog. I miss his annoying bark and how he was always underfoot. I miss his deep stares and the way he cuddled up with me to watch television. I just miss his big dopey butt.

I've been writing like a fiend lately, burning the midnight oil, getting a couple hours of sleep, drinking half a pot of coffee, and going at it again. I'm running out of time. The new perfumery course begins on the 18th of September, and I'm moving in two weeks, so I'm going to miss a week or so of writing time. Crucial writing time. The course has literally one module left to flesh out, then it's on to the teacher's manual, where the meat of the course's potatoes will be.

I'm at a place where I'm missing things to the point of pain. Emotional pain. I miss being able to take good photos with my fancy pants camera (that is packed). I miss working out formulations and experimenting with natural raw materials (that are packed). I miss having space to set things out, to study them, give 'em a good stare and a sniff (because everything's packed!) All of these things were my escape chutes. Ways to get away from the daily stress of unhappy people making certain everyone knows they're unhappy. It's a vicious cycle. They're upset and unhappy, that makes me upset and unhappy, that makes them upset and unhappy, so on and so forth. I just don't know how much more of this sardines-in-a-can life I can take. I feel like my whole life has been put on hold since November because of a damn house! There is a light at the end of the tunnel, but the closer it gets, the farther away it feels.

We blue tape tomorrow. It's the official walk-through where we're instructed how to use the appliances, where the warranty information will be, how the AC works, the on-demand water heater, the communications' hub, how to switch on lights, where the exhaust fan switches are, where to plug in the phones to charge them, the type of tile, carpet, paint, insulation, light fixtures, piping, etc., that they've used in our house. Then we get to go around with rolls of blue tape marking the spots we feel need repair. Wee cracks. Badly patched walls. Ugly tile work. Nicks and dings and scrapes. The last time we checked on the house, there was a big crate of peaches in the fridge, a Klondike ice cream wrapper on the newly carpeted stairs, and an empty bottle of jamaica Jarritos in the kitchen counter. It's a little disconcerting to realize we're not going to be the first people to use the fridge, or the toilets, in this brand new house.

Some strides to make it a home have been made, though. Long ago we put a bunch of towels and bathroom items on layaway, mostly because we had no where to store them until the move. We've ordered and received the living room curtains -- a cream with mauve watercolor flowers for the panels, and cream linen-like sheers. I know I've called the house the Plum Palace, but I'm not looking to go full purple here. Shades of purple are the main color scheme, along with pale greens, soft greys, and creams, with the occasional aubergine and royal purple thrown in. And magenta. And maybe some ox blood. And orange. Ha!

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Last Saturday's Soap Class

The soap class went very well, with one minor slip-up -- the soap mold we were using decided to bust a seam and began leaking soap, so it had to be dumped back into the pot and a new mold used, which had problems as well, but we got it figured out and moved on from that disaster. We started early for a class, 9AM, which was a godsend since the day began heating up around 11. We were done by lunch and most of us went on a field trip down the street to the Blossom Trail Cafe for lunch. Now we're getting requests for more classes in soap making, incense making, and perfume making. I'm not doing anymore classes until I'm moved into my house. And then once I'm set up there, I'm going to create a portable perfumer's box so it's always at the ready and I don't have to scramble anymore to collect things -- I'm going to do the same with soap and incense. These will be used for classes and demonstrations only and restocked as they are used. Living out of a suitcase for the past 10 months has taught me that having what I need at hand will save me days (months in this case) of frustration and anxiety. Being separated from my art is having a profound effect on my mental health, so I'm now sure, with unwavering certainty, that I could never stop doing what I do or I just might go crazy -- er.

I didn't get pictures of the class because I was busy teaching it. There is a slideshow on FB via the Seasons of Spirit and Curio Apothecary page. It's short and sweet, like 15 seconds, and shows the participants and a little bit of the soap making process. Not the disaster, though. Perhaps in the future I will hire a photographer to take snaps while we're working and make a slideshow that includes all the mishaps, and then how they were corrected and post them to a FB page or website specific to the classes I teach. I think I just created more work for myself.

I've been working on the course curriculum for the past few weeks. I've rewritten a large portion, perhaps 80%, of the new International Perfume Foundation certified course, and nary a word on the new teacher's manual -- which looks like it might turn into a book. I am not saying I'm turning it into a book, just that there will be material in it that isn't in the course and that it will be -- crap, it'll be so much more work! I've got notes and research materials and sources and how-to information spread from one end of my desk (it's my bed, actually) to the other that have to be gathered daily and sorted through and put into a fat, bulging binder every night before I go to sleep. Then the next day, they all come out again, with additions, and I pick through it like a junker at a peddler's fair, trying to find something that will fit into a specific section's narrative.

Sometime last year or the year before I got a YouTube review for my Kyphi booklet. I remember the woman conducting the review said a little bit about how small the book was, but then expanded that commentary to include that it was, what she called, 'a can of tuna'. A can of tuna in relation to this review meant that my little booklet was packed full of information, no fluff, no airy fairy details, just 'meat'. That's what I'm working towards with this new course. The whole thing from beginning to end, including the teacher's manual, is going to be one big can of tuna.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Soap Making Day

Today is a soap making day. We'll be making it to 'serve' to our students on Saturday after making another batch of the same soap for demonstration. The scent formulation is fairly simple and straight forward -- petit grain sur fleur neroli is the main raw material, then there's orange oil, lemon oil, patchouli, and a wee bit of labdanum. We made the scent potion last week and it's been 'stewing' ever since. We're hoping to have a full house, upwards of 20 students, and instead of what I usually do, it's going to be a straight demonstration type class. Usually, I allow students to measure and mix, but with a class this size, it won't work out. People bump into each other, everyone wants a turn at the hand blender, plus I am required to provide aprons, gloves, goggles, and sometimes paper face masks. It's too much of an expenditure when I cut the price of the class as low as it is now. This area is a hard sale area -- I've charged anywhere from $40 to $65 everywhere else that I teach this soap class, but here, I'm lucky to get $20. It's not the fault of the good folks who live here, it's the fault of the local economy. You know something isn't right when you drive through town and a huge billboard (more than one, actually) proclaims: "50% of (blank) County is on Medicaid". I haven't quite figured out if the billboard's message is condemnation or praise of the current health care plan provided by the state, but one thing is for certain, if 50% of the residents of this county actually are on medicaid, then something's wrong with the economy here. Under these circumstances, it's a miracle anyone comes out to learn any kind of craft on a warm Saturday morning for more than $15 a person.

I am looking forward to it. These days I'm lucky to have some creative work besides writing to do. As some of you know, I'm rewriting the natural perfumery course at the Natural Perfume Academy where I teach, and it's turned out to be quite the challenge. For example, there is literally one topic left to complete before the edit, final edit, and addition of a full teacher's manual, slide shows, videos, and audio files to the course, and I'm at a standstill. I worked and worked and worked yesterday, poring through books and notebooks, writing and rewriting, researching online, doing everything I could to get this cohesive piece of work done, and I got nothing. What I wrote, I erased. I was confounded by lack of sleep, too much on my plate, and grandbabies busting in shouting, "Grandma!" every 10 minutes. I'm hoping to get back at it tomorrow with a clear head and new perspective. Working in the arts is a moody occupation -- you can be simultaneously depressed and tortured over the outcome, and at the same time feel intense exhilaration from the act of creating alone. A double-edged sword.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Bama's Last Walk

A year ago last June my ex-husband was killed in a car accident. He was with his 12-year-old-daughter (not mine) on his way out of town to a classic car show in Carson City, Nevada, and he was driving his custom 1928 Ford Roadster that he built from the ground up. His Roadster was a convertible, had no seat belts, and, ironically, carried a custom made coffin in the truck bed. Both my ex and his daughter were thrown from the vehicle and landed in rush hour traffic on the 168/180 interchange. Fortunately his daughter survived the wreck with minor scrapes and bruising. My ex, however, sustained major head trauma from which he did not recover. There are a half dozen folks in the world right now carrying bits and pieces of him inside of them -- kidneys and corneas and who knows what else. A month after he passed, my son, one of two children I had with my ex, reluctantly handed over his father's dog, Bama. Bama was a foundling snatched from the streets, a little worse for the wear and happy as a clam that someone found him, got him out of the heat and put some food in his belly. Bama's always been an exhuberant guy. Always happy to see people, always there with a big toothy grin and a vigorously wiggly bum. He's a well-mannered young man. Fully house and leash trained, gentle with children, and adores kitties. Basically, the perfect dog. Today we are having him put to sleep.

Osteosarcoma is bone cancer that is common in larger breed dogs. Bama is a pit bull, robust, barrel chested, and long-legged with a healthy appetite and penchant for long evening walks, or as we like to call them, drags. He hasn't wanted to do those things so much lately. His appetite comes and goes. His love of getting harnessed up and out into the yard has diminished. He sleeps long hours and often doesn't move except to lap up water or ask to go outside for a wee. Last October we noticed Bama had a bit of a lump on his snout, halfway between his eye and the tip of his nose. We took him in and the vet diagnosed an abscess in his gums above his big teeth in the back of his jaw, and recommended having the tooth pulled to relieve the pressure, and then put Bama on a round of antibiotics. During the two-week recovery period we all noticed that the lump got larger. The vet put him on another round of antibiotics. Two weeks later the lump was four times as large. We sought the opinion of another vet, one who came highly recommended as a straight shooter. He shot us all straight through the heart when he said Bama had bone cancer and wouldn't survive for more than six months. He recommended we put him to sleep right then and there to spare him the pain of the tumors that would spread, if they hadn't already, to his lungs, liver, and throughout his bones, but we just couldn't do it yet. Over the past month Bama's health has diminished, just as the vet said it would, to the point that he isn't able to hold his bowels long enough to get outside, his feces are watery and mucousy, his mouth bleeds profusely, when he sleeps, his lungs make sounds like an old bellows. When we walk into the room he is in, he no longer raises his head to check who it is. He just lays there, thumping his tail on the floor, as if he's too exhausted to give a proper greeting. He still growls and barks when someone knocks on the front door, and I think that his doing that, as he always has, has given us a sense of false hope that he is okay. It takes a lot out of him to jump up and bark as he saunters to the front door. There are signs of false hope everywhere, signs that we interpret as it not being time just yet, like last night when I set down his food and his companion dog's food and Bama went to town eating both. He hadn't done that in weeks. In fact, he's never done that, not like that. He usually waits for Mary Jane, his dog friend, to eat a little off her plate before stealing the rest, but last night he just butted his way in and ate it.

Today is the day. Bama isn't himself. He's in pain. His body is failing him. At 10:45 we take him in for his last walk.

RIP Bama, 7-12-2017, 11:07 AM

Saturday, July 08, 2017

108 and No AC

It's predicted to be 108 degrees Fahrenheit today, and I woke early this morning, 5 am, to heat that I learned was the result of a broken AC unit. Great. It's the capacitor or the contactor. The outside compressor thingey clicks but doesn't come on. Of course, we'll probably have to wait for an HVAC "professional" to fix it, which could be hours, or could be days. Either way, it's 6:15 am now and 83 degrees Fahrenheit in the house and rising, and I know these people, it's going to one miserable damned day.


Wednesday, July 05, 2017

Experiential Intuition

The past few days have been difficult, and not because of the hou -- oops! Forgot that I'm not going to talk about it anymore! I have been having a really hard time sleeping and moving around because I tore the cartilage on a lower rib reaching for, of all things, my little granddaughters 'baby', aka, stuffed pink teddy bear. In order to get baby, I reached over the hard wooden arm of a love seat and under the end table next to the love seat to reach baby and over extended in my haste to stop the screaming (baby! baby! baby!) and *crunch* that's all she wrote. It's six to 12 weeks of tenderness and pain and restless nights and not picking up heavy objects.

2010 Academy of Perfuming Arts Promotional Perfumery Kit

This down time has given me the opportunity to read through notes as I found the box in the garage with all of my old notebooks for perfumery going back to 2005 with all of my grand ideas about how perfumes are created, and I came to realize that nearly all of my work -- all of the good work -- has been the result of intuitively selecting raw materials and intuitively formulating them into perfumes. That word 'intuitively' is a loaded word, though. It means 'without conscious reasoning, or by instinct'. How can a first-time perfumer create something good using only their intuition? They can't.  In order for the work to be intuitive (?), there has to be a good, solid base of experience, which is counter to intuition. What I teach my students is that they have to study the raw materials, inside and out. That's the basis for becoming "intuitive" in natural perfumery. Knowing exactly which patchouli within the working palette will elevate a formulation over another patchouli, and knowing -- or at least having a very, very good idea -- how rose otto 5% dilution will behave in an accord of sandalwood 10% (Mysore) and a weak tincture of Siam benzoin. This is where intuition comes into play -- experiential intuition. This is intuition based on what you already know about the character and behavior of any given raw material within a composition, and it takes years to master.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Writing Again

It's been nearly two weeks since I started rewriting the course curriculum at The Natural Perfume Academy, also known as The Academy of Perfuming Arts. I'm taking a break from it today while the course administrator, Ruth, works on some technical issues. The school is down for maintenance and even I can't get in. I'm getting time off from this enormous pile of notes and print outs and the long list of add ons and fixes. I can't say I haven't enjoyed it, because I have. This newer course is truer to my feelings and beliefs when it comes to the art of natural perfumery. It's real. It's also much less overwhelming for a six-month course, and much more revealing. The exploration of natural perfumery moves away from basic facts and plodding themes to getting down and dirty with the experiential exercises.

What all this writing has revealed is that at the core of it all, I'm experiencing a lot of depression over not having a proper studio. Making soap here and there is fine and well, but it doesn't go far enough to feed the creative fire. My perfumer's studio, my work space, my art, is my anti-depressant. Whenever things get tough -- and believe me, the last 5 months have been nearly intolerable -- I always had my art to turn to. I don't have that right now, and my only recourse -- my only creative outlet -- is to write about perfumery, like a long, lost love.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Ah, Life

It's a funny, fickle jerk for sure. I came as close as I've been in a long time to a break down yesterday -- over that damn house! Move in date is August 11. I should be happy, right? I'm happy that there's a definitive date, not happy that it's all the way in August! Back in November we commissioned the house and were told April or May -- yeah, yeah, I know, add a month to six weeks to that and that's the real date. But in December it began raining, and it didn't really stop until last month. So add another month. Throw in a shortage of house painters, and add yet another month. And here we sit. Firmly planted in August. The house is soooo close to being completed, I actually already see my furniture in there. There's even landscaping in the front yard. But there it is, naked of trim, carpetless, no appliances or lighting fixtures. I know I go on too much about that house, but to truly appreciate my frustration, you need to understand the situation in the current home. It is my daughter's place, we were invited to stay, but since we made that agreement one of my son's had some family issues and ended up moving in, then another son who moved out of state came back and is just getting back on his feet, so he moved in. Then the first son mentioned here sorted out his family issues and his family moved in. We are all waiting on this house. It's a multi-family type of thing and close to 3000 square feet. My daughter's house? It's about 1000 square feet and it's busting at the seams with bodies. There are ten of us now, plus a dog. Thank heavens most of us have somewhere to be during the day, or this situation could get ugly. So far everyone's been very patient. I'm trying to be patient, but this situation got old way back in December when I couldn't get a foothold with the perfumery, so . . . I probably won't say anything about the house here until we're moved in. Subject temporarily laid to rest.

I'm going out to open the store and farm today. By myself. My partner in crime is with the bookkeepers out of town for a while, so I go it alone. It's okay. I'm bringing a book and some snacks, plus there's always something to pluck or plant out there. I'm waiting on a shipment of shea butter and then we'll be back in the soap game. I've got a fat bottle of petitgrain sur fleur neroli just screaming to be made into soap.

Feeling kind of de-energized right now. Because of -- well, you know why.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

More Shuckin'

Part of yesterday was spent shucking the other pile of white sage flowering head/branch things. Which means a little more resin came my way. Because we've run out of drying space, and because there is still so much more to dry, we decided to let go of the tippy top of the flower heads instead of drying them for incense (we have four more white sage bushes to trim, so there's plenty left). A local artisan is coming to pick them up this afternoon and use them for whatever purpose she chooses. For free. Sometimes the bounty is more than we can handle. If we were more, and had the extra woman power, we'd be okay. But with just two of us handling the minutiae beyond the basic stuff that keeps everything going -- and we do have help with the watering and weeding and planting and whatnot -- it can become overwhelming. It took two hours to shuck the first pile of white sage, and another hour-and-a-half to shuck the second. It was tedious, but it was also a good time to think. I don't get a lot of thinking time anymore, what with the house becoming fuller in preparation to move, and the ebb and flow of various and sundry personalities and moods pushing against one another. It gets downright stressful and stays that way for days on end. Too many bodies crammed into too little space and that big house just sitting there waiting for baseboards and carpet to complete it and no movement on that front, it just gets to be too much. I fear I am quickly reaching a breaking point.

I was going to schedule a soap making class for this upcoming Saturday, but decided against it when the main road to the farm became more difficult to traverse. Now they're paving, and I'll give those guys their due, it's a lot of paving they have in front of them. However, when I can't get through via either end of the route and I'm told by the guys holding the stop signs to go the other way, well, I kind of lose my patience. After the second time being told to go the other way after just coming from the other way, I told the guy no. I just came from there and they sent me here. Finally I made it through after almost 30 minutes of back and forth, and mind you, this is less than a five minute trek -- heck, it may be less than two minutes! But there I was, going this way, and then that way, burning gas and time. Not a good way to start the work week. This crap, along with the current housing crap, and the future housing crap, it's just too much crap right now. My enthusiasm wanes.

But good things are happening. After hitting a few hitches and bumps, we finally got the Natural Perfume Academy's big announcement out of the way. We've teamed up with the International Perfume Foundation to present the New Luxury Code, and to become a certified natural perfume school with the IPF. Our graduating students will now receive a one-year membership to the IPF and certification from the IPF along with a course completion certificate from NPA. It's really more of a big deal for our students than for us as it gives our fresh new graduates opportunities internationally to attend workshops and classes given by other IPF certified teachers. It isn't so much about permission as it is about access. And community. And a hand up instead of a foot in the face. If you're interested in what the IPF is all about, follow this LINK. And more good news -- we are going to have a Spanish language course to add to the Academy soon.

It isn't all about dire personal struggles and self-doubt.


Monday, June 12, 2017


I Want A Yurt


Pricey, but what fun, right? Take the yurt camping, to the beach, hanging out by the river, or -- or use it as a portable classroom. I mean, how fun would it be to reserve a spot in a beautiful park and then set up the yurt to learn perfumery?

Sunday, June 11, 2017

White Sage Resin

I spent a little bit of time this morning 'shucking' white sage stems gone to seed. What I was doing was removing the few leaves and cutting the bare stick (wand) leaving only the flowering end. All parts of this will be used somewhere -- the leaves, the sticks/wands, and the flowering heads.  By accident I discovered that the white sage shucking left a heavy resin on my cotton work gloves. It so reminded me of the stories I'd read about labdanum and how it is harvested with big rakes hung with strips of fabric to pick up the resin on the bushes. The 'ancient' way this was done was by scraping or pulling the bits of resin off of a shepherd's goats after they walked through the rock rose covered hillsides. That type of extract created a labdanum that had a hint of animal funk. Anyway, I digress. I scraped the resin off of my gloves and rolled a 1.5 gram ball of white sage resin that smells so intense, so deep and soulful. I'm thinking of performing some experiments with boiling the flowering heads to find out if I can get some resin to rise. Or maybe the stems. Probably both.

Friday, June 09, 2017

Plums!

I finally made it out to the farm and did a bit of harvesting. Not a whole lot because we're still a wee bitty place and a lot of our plants aren't full-fledged big harvest plants -- yet. We have most of the lavender harvested, but there isn't a lot. Not enough for a big distillation, but enough to keep us supplied with lavender for potpourris, teas, and sachets. We have a decent sized oregano patch and I chop on it every other day or so. The big bounty is coming up, though, first with the plums getting ready to go as I write this, then the nectarines, and then we'll be into tomato season, and, remember, I wrote earlier in the year that we have over 50 tomato plants to harvest from. We've got all sorts of tomatoes, from Romas to brandywines to heirloom to hybrid, red, green, and yellow. Big ones, small ones, fat ones, round ones, lumpy ones, and wee teeny sweet ones. And we get eggs daily from the formerly free-range chickens in the big coop. There's a mother fox and her kittens living on the farm now and we can't let the chickens do their usual bug hunt during the day anymore because we fear the foxes. But they live a life of luxury, those chickens, being fed farm-raised chemical-free weeds and harvest leftovers along with their usual feed, plus they have lots of room to cluck about in.

We've run into a snag on the distillation front. There are some things we need to do to get the set-up fine tuned. We have two heat sources for this unit, one is electric with a heating coil inside the retort, and the other option is to remove the coil, plug the hole it came from, and heat on propane. However, our propane set-up is somewhat flawed and needs work, and we're also working on the recirculating cooling system so it's more efficient and saves water. The coil heating system doesn't allow for variables without additional equipment, and we're just not ready to make that jump as gas is available and controllable as far as heat settings go, once we get the system perfected. So basically we're out of the distillation game until these issues are corrected. Oh, and we had to buy a new pump because the old pump couldn't handle the new volume. We found a bigger pump in an old fountain out here on the farm, but we quickly burned that one up, so I went to my favorite store in the world, Harbor Freight, for a new heavy-duty pump. We've yet to put it to use. Our distillation of white and musk sage didn't turn out so great. Like I said, we need to fine tune the distillation set-up and then we'll be ready to go.

It's always something, right?

Today is Bug's kindergarten graduation. Boy, how time flies. It just seems like yesterday that I lay next to her tiny body and played with her jet black hair as she sucked on her knuckles, and now she's a string bean with long honey-blonde hair, no front teeth, and a twinkle in her eyes. And a graduate. Ha!

Thursday, June 08, 2017

Ah, Life!

Yesterday was a weird day. I got a late start after weeks of early beginnings, and just as I was getting ready to leave for the farm, I got news from the new lender on our home that they needed all the information we'd given the old lender at this beginning of this ordeal, plus copies of our cashed checks proving we paid the required deposits because they didn't have any of them! The original loan company received the money, but halfway through the process, the loan was sold to another company and a portion of the paperwork had to be resubmitted to the new company. What. The. Bloody. Crap? So yesterday I was running around like a chicken with my head cut off, running down cancelled checks, trying to remember where the original loan documents were (remember, we're living out of suitcases right now), printing copies of tax returns and bank statements and blood types. I'm just kidding about the blood types thing, but it almost feels like that's a requirement for buying a house. We're so close to this being over, just waiting for that call to come in and sign the final paperwork before they hand over the keys, and then this happens.

Besides all that, I'm also working on this project for the Natural Perfume Academy, and it was a real slam to feel so high and happy over the developments there, and then the house issue came up. Isn't this how life is, though? When one part of your life is going along smoothly and couldn't be better, another part is blowing up in your face. All I can do is step over the shrapnel and keep on walking, like I always do.

And there's the farm and getting that to become a destination point for classes and workshops and goods. It's constant work there with watering and harvesting and tending, planting, replanting, transferring plants, sowing, weeding, and sweating. This whole year, so far, feels sloggy. Like it's all uphill in deep, sucking mud. There is no choice but to keep going. Quitting is not an option, on all fronts.

And there are lots of good things happening still. Like the stuff with the perfumery course, and the lovely harvests coming out of the farm.




Tuesday, June 06, 2017

The Natural Perfume Academy

So, I'm currently working on a project that will, if all goes well, bring more students for enrollment into the Natural Perfume Academy where I teach/tutor prospective natural perfumers. This is a big deal, this project, and not just for the Academy, but for those prospective students as well. It's a game changer. It will require a bit of tweaking of the curriculum, namely removing any instruction in natural isolates, and playing up the importance of gardening and/or sourcing some of your own raw materials. The goal is to get back to basics, to stick with proveable naturals and teach the students how to create natural perfume the right way, without all the hokum. Now, I can't undo the book -- Working the Bench II -- wherein an entire chapter is dedicated to the study of natural isolates, and another chapter demonstrates how to use natural isolates in a formulation, but I can commit myself to never using them again. As I mentioned in a previous post here, I don't use natural isolates anymore, not since I wrote the book and used them in research for the book. I've never been entirely comfortable with them, despite the few successful creations. Earlier in the year, or perhaps it was late last year, I removed all posts on this blog pertaining to the use of natural isolates in a knee-jerk reaction. Now I wish I hadn't erased those posts because no one can change the past, not really, and there are such things as screen grabs. But people change. One hopes for the better and not the worse, and I think dropping the use of natural isolates in my perfumes is for the better. I think one of the points I make in the book is that there is no way for a natural perfumer to be sure that their natural isolate, let's say eugenol, came from a plant source and wasn't created synthetically. That's really been a sticking point for me, not being certain of the source, and despite that truth, I tried really, really hard to love natural isolates so I could use them to improve my perfume formulations. But it just didn't turn out that way.

So now I'm focusing on strictly natural naturals, and that includes proveable naturals, like the stuff I can extract myself. Which is where the farm comes into play. Right now the farm is in its infancy so the only plant materials we have in abundance to distill are white sage and lavender, and a little less lavender than what we need, actually. There is some rose geranium but not enough to make gallons of hydrosol or ounces of oil, but enough to get us started. At the moment, the focus is on witching herbs for the apothecary, and food. But all of this plays into the 'back to naturals' movement we're building upon. Because we were so unprepared this year with minimal wo/man power and not enough hours in the day, a lot of good raw materials were lost to the season. Like jasmine, and rock rose (though that may be remedied later in the summer). We had a small hyacinth bed that bloomed beautifully, but I think we lost the extraction to moisture. All of these things are opportunities for learning more about the earth-to-bottle movement.

If you're interested in learning about natural perfumery, contact Ruth at The Natural Perfume Academy. The fall session begins in September, and that's when the big news comes into play for our natural perfumery students.

Monday, June 05, 2017

This is Becoming Redundant -- More, More Soap


Sweet Scented Geranium (rose geranium) shea butter soap. It smells like heaven!


Sunday, June 04, 2017

More Soap & Farm Stuff


Yesterday at the farm was somewhat productive. We didn't get a lot of customers, but we were able to get some more soap made. This batch is made from some of those oils my friend, Bella, sent. Loaded with rose geranium, clary sage, lavender and rose. We topped it off with an incense blend from the shop called 'India Rose' which is comprised of our own blend of rose petals, clove buds, star anise, and myrrh gum. Just to give it a little dimensional flavah.

The Sun in the Trees soap turned out beautifully. It's a very nice summery fresh scent. Kind of intense, too. The bars aren't as big as the Qayiz soap bars at 8 ounces or better. SitT's bars are more like six to six point five ounces, and I trimmed them up, something I almost never do.









Sun In The Trees features the scent of tagetes, lavender, blood orange, fir balsam, petitgrain, with added ground herbs of chamomile, calendula, and spearmint. These are just stunning.

Saturday, June 03, 2017

New Soap & Farm Stuff

Today the farm and shop will be open for the first time as an entity independent of an event. In other words, we're open today. I wish I could share photos of what we've been up to lately, but I'm not having much luck getting them off my device and onto my pictures' file. I'm not all that tech savvy, and I'm too flippin' tired to figure it all out at the moment. The point is, the changes from earlier photos that I've shared here and now are as different as day and night. The tomatoes are knee-high, the sage is sprouting long flower cones, the chickens are laying over a dozen eggs a day, our culinary herbs are looking good, our blueberries are becoming ripe, as are the berries on the boysenberry bush, the onions have matured and have been pulled, lots of herbs are going to seed, we're making soap -- oh, the newest soap is a nod in the direction of Woodspirits' Sun and Sky soap -- a very sideways glancing type of nod. The color is 100% natural; German chamomile and homegrown calendula for the 'sun' part, and spearmint and fir balsam absolute for the 'sky' part. We were going for pale yellow and pale green. Layers were the goal, but our timing was off and instead we got swirls -- or in this case, gloops. The yellow part we scented with blood orange, petitgrain bigarade, and tagetes, and the green side we scented with fir balsam, and high altitude French lavender. We call it Sun in the Trees, I call it Alshshams fi Al'Ashjar, which is the same thing in Arabic. On the loaf that was made for the farm, we tucked little dried calendula flowers on top, on the loaf going into my Etsy shop we left plain.

Yesterday I received a BIG box of oils from my friend Bella (Kimberly Ayers). I now have a huge bottle of orange oil, another huge bottle of lemon oil, and various smaller bottles of vetyver and rose geranium. All of it is headed for the soap pot. Rose geranium soap! I haven't made a rose g. soap in a while. I also haven't made a lemon soap in ages. I remember back in the day when my cousins would ask me to make a lemon soap and I would struggle getting enough lemon oil into the soap base to make it smell like lemon. Took a few batches, but I finally figured out how to blend lemongrass into a mash-up of different citrus oils, including lemon, to make something that would actually smell lemony long after the soap cured. I'm not even going to try to make a lemon soap with that lemon oil, it's just going to be a secondary scent in a pretty soap later on.

Gotta run. The farm awaits.

Thursday, June 01, 2017

Harvest Days

I'm off to the farm early today for two reasons, 1) it's going to be HOT! So I want to get the work done as early as possible before the heat sets in, and 2) I have to pick up the granddaughter from school in the afternoon. That leaves me with about 7 hours in at the farm, so a lot is going to be going on. I'm setting up the distillation unit to do a co-distill of white sage and blue sage flowering tops, and I'm making soap. I have to. It's the only thing I have time or space to make for the Etsy shop. Perfumery, incense, and skincare other than soap will have to wait for another day. I'm also harvesting the lavender, and whatever else needs harvesting. I don't know if there will be enough lavender for a distillation as we are going to use most of it in decorative bundles and for making tea. Oh, and peaches. I've got to harvest peaches and make more jams and jellys. It's going to be a busy day for sure.

Monday, May 29, 2017

The Official Word

Despite my depression over the length of time it's taking to get our house done and done, I decided that now that the building schedule for our house is complete, I'd find out from the builder exactly when we're moving in. The official word is July. The final install, the carpet, is scheduled for the last week in June, after that it's going through and making repairs and touch ups to things that got scraped and bashed while putting it all together, and then having the cleaning crew come in and do the wipe-down. That can be scheduled out to mid-July. So this project has gone from a done date of April/May to June now to July. I am reluctantly optimistic. The living conditions at the daughter's place are becoming unbearably cramped with the addition of two new full-time occupants, and two part-time occupants. It's complicated.

The only thing keeping my head on straight is the farm. And soap, since it's really the only thing from my repertoire of goods that I can make at the moment. My friend, Ana, posted something on FB about Woodspirits Soap and their creator, Barbara Bobo. That post brought back a lot of memories for me. Another friend, M., made an almost perfect copy of Woodspirits 'Sun and Sky' soap that was loaded with tagetes and ginger and bergamot. It was a two-sided soap with half being blue and half being bright as the sun yellow. And the scent was divine. It reminded me of how I want to make soap again. I kind of got back on that gig last fall when I made the seaweed soap and the sky soap with white sage hydrosol. The bars were really small, though. I'm back in the big bar game again. I just ordered a bunch of soap from Ana and the soaps, as usual, blew me away. There aren't many soapmakers -- in fact, there are none other than hers -- that I will go out of my way to purchase anymore. Variety is the spice of life, right? I used to buy from lots of other soapmakers, but in the past five years or so, I've been sorely disappointed by them. It seems like no one makes soap with the magic in the mix anymore. Sometimes even I miss the mark. But Ana never does.


Sunday, May 28, 2017

Qayiz Natural Botanical Super Fragrant Chunky Hunky Cocoa & Shea Butter Soap!

As some of you may have gathered already, I like patchouli. So it shouldn't surprise you that I have a LOT of patchouli on hand at any given time. Though the bulk of my oils are still packed, I have been buying a bottle of patchouli with every order since November 2016, and now I have a nice little 'collection' of patchouli oils that I use quite sparingly, except in soap. I had a 4 oz bottle of Sri Lankan patchouli oil, which wasn't cheap, by the way, until I used over half of it in this last batch of soap, Qayiz. If you are one of those patchouli haters, I can almost guarantee with 100% certainty that you will at least like the patchouli oils coming out of Sri Lanka. They're velvety and sweet, like dark chocolate with hints of vanilla and deep indolic florals. There is very little of that dusty, musty, dry, brittle leafy pitch that a lot of patchouli oils have (though I do love those as well). I have had perfume clients creating custom scent who proclaimed to heaven that they absolutely abhorred patchouli who wound up choosing the sample perfume that had Sri Lankan patchouli in it as their 'signature scent'.

Newest Soap ~
 Qayiz, loaded with patchouli, labdanum, blood orange, a touch of basil, and an entire wee bottle of Australian sandalwood. This soap is made with virgin olive oil, coconut oil, cocoa butter, and shea butter. The lather is creamy and copious and intensely fragrant. The bars are 8 ounces each (or more) with every gram smelling of heaven. It's a very sensual scent, sexy, and smells delectable on anyone. The wee sliver in my shower is decreasing in size very quickly as everyone is using it up, even the folks in the house who say 'it smells like everything else you make' like it's an insult. Am I insulted? Not in the least. Not when they ask, 'hey, can you hook me up?' in reference to getting some of this soap. I haven't made a soap this stinky since the Orange Blossom & Fennel soap I made just before Christmas last year. That soap was made with a lot of orange blossom floral wax, neroli, and then patchouli (of course), fennel, labdanum, and a bunch of other stuff I can't remember. What was so special about that one, besides being super fragrant, was that it was loaded to the hilt with shea butter. It took two months to become solid enough to sell. And then I got the side-eye (figuratively speaking) from everyone (customers) who thought orange blossom and fennel was a no-go. Boy, did they find out they were wrong. Sold out quick and was asked for more. I'm kind of hoping the same goes with this new one, Qayiz. I'd give it away if it didn't cost so much to make. In fact, my price on the bars, $11 each, seems a bit high, but I can assure you, I'm barely making anything on them. Just enough to get back into the soap space to make some more. If you want to give this new soap a spin in your bath, go to my Etsy site, TheScentedDjinn, and get you some.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

A Day In May

I realized I didn't update you on the A Day In May Celebration craft show thingamabobby that we did at the farm last Saturday. That's mostly because I wanted to put it out of my mind. It was awful and great at the same time. Awful because there was major road construction on the main road leading to the road to the farm which effectively blocked off 80%, if not more, of our potential customers, and included our one and only food vendor. I won't get into it, but that guy didn't show up because of the road construction despite a perfectly sound alternative being offered. Next, it got hot fast and a few of our vendors started out in the shade and by noon were sitting out exposed in the sweltering heat. So they packed up and sat with us in the shade for a bit before leaving early. We had customers, new faces, people who went out of their way and braved the twisty, convoluted route to the farm, who truly enjoyed their visit. The scheduled soap making demo never happened because there just weren't enough people at any one time to do one. I did toy with the idea of just making a batch of soap to have soap on hand, but I think I was too bummed out to do it then. Despite the poor turn out, everyone who did manage to make it out had a lovely time, they bought from the vendors and from the wee witchy shop at the farm, and promised, once the roadways were clear again, to return to another of our events. And we did have music. My son and his band mate, Brendan Kelley, showed up for an unplugged acoustic set which went off without a hitch, until Brendan's final song when he made me and a couple of other people cry. They took as their cue to bow out. My son, Daryl, said, "It's probably a good idea to leave once you make your audience cry." We probably won't have another 'fair' like this until the fall, but we are planning classes, demos, teas, moon events, and drum circles throughout the summer months.

I have not been idle these past few days. I did return to the farm and make that big batch of soap. And the same day, I took home a pail of peaches that were in peril of going bad, along with a big handful of freshly cut lavender flowers, and made lavender peach jelly out of them. The jelly turned out beautifully. I'm very pleased with it. A few jars may go on the Etsy site in a few days -- or not. I'm already brainstorming holiday gifts for family and friends.

I've much more to say, but right now my mind is scrambled. I've not been sleeping well and I'm on grandchild duty and have been for the past week. It's exhausting. I'm exhausted. And ticking off the days until I get into my new house and get my life back in some sort of order.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Creamy Delicious Dark Soap!

So I finally made some soap. Forgot to take pictures to share, but rest assured, they're big hunkin' slabs of shea, coconut, olive, and cocoa buttery deliciousness! They don't smell too bad either. I used a LOT of dark Sri Lankan patchouli, the stuff that isn't dusty and musty smelling, the stuff that's sweet and almost floral, then I splashed just a teeny bit of basil in, then a big dose of blood orange, and then topped it all off with more Sri Lankan patchouli, a whole wee bottle of sandalwood, and a healthy dose of sultry labdanum absolute. The whole mess smells of something ambery and lush. I'm thinking of calling it Qayiz, which is the Arabic word for 'sultry'. It's pronounced 'ka-eez(m)' or at least it sounds that way when I listen. The only thing missing from this soap is tobacco absolute, and maybe a dash of oakmoss. Do you realize it's been months since I last made soap? Six since I made a big, old stinky batch like this. These bars are big, too, probably 7 ounces at least, enough to cut off pieces to use one at a time rather than taking the whole bar into the bath, though I do love to hold those big chunky bars and breathe deeply as they get all bubbly. I'm not sure what the next batch will be, but I'm hoping to get some lavender going, and some rosemary. I love ginger soap too . . . so, it's a toss up.

The soap will be up on the Etsy shop website in a week or so.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

A Day In May Celebration

The Farm's first official introduction to the masses (mini-masses?) commences on the 20th of May at our long-awaited 'A Day In May Celebration' craft show. We're nearly done setting the adorable shop which is housed in a 1952 travel trailer. Oh, the stuff we've managed to cram in there . . . and there's more. The plants on the farm are thriving, though I noted to my partner in crime, Shannon, just yesterday that I'm frustrated the plants aren't on the same page and growing faster to keep up with demand. It's going to be a scorcher that day in May -- predicted to be around 92 degrees F. All week it's been a lovely, liveable 75 to 78, but the day of the event the powers that be decided to turn up the heat.

What a wild and often harrowing last few months it's been getting this farm and shop in order. What we imagined in the beginning as a month or so at most putting things to rights has turned into five months of toil and tears and a niggling feeling that we're still not quite there. But alas, we must forge on with what we've got or else we won't be making any money to get those loose ends tied up.



There is road construction on the main road from Fresno to the farm so alternate routes will have to be mapped so that you arrive on Belmont (the main road) from the east, and bypass all the "Road Closed" signs to reach Nelson Avenue. Parking is provided in front of the redwood trees on the road in front of the farm. Hopefully, we will be able to get the signs done indicating where to park and where not to park.


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